Child Car Seat Program

Did you know that 4 out of 5 Child Car Seats are installed incorrectly?  You can have your car seat install checked by a trained professional. We have Certified Child Car Seat Technicians to assist you in installing your safety seats. Please call 419-774-4726 for an appointment.  Health Education checks child seat installations on Fridays!

Best Car Seat Recommendations

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in 2011 posted the best Car Seat recommendations for safety:

NHTSA has released a guidelines on child restraints categorizing by age rather than by type of child seats in order to keep pace with the latest scientific and medical research and the development of new child restraint technologies. Under these guidelines, NHTSA is advising parents and caregivers to keep children in each restraint type, including rear-facing, forward-facing and booster seats, for as long as possible, using the weight limits of the car seat, before moving them up to the next type of seat.

Recommendations For All Ages

  • Select a car seat based on your child’s age, height, and weight.
  • Keep your child in the proper car seat for as long as possible.
  • All children under 13 should ride in the back seat.
  • Follow the car seat manufacturer’s instructions and your vehicle owners manual on how to install.

Did you know that Ohio has a law requiring children to be in boosters seats?

Once your child is over 40 pounds and more than a four years old, they must then be in a booster seat until 8 years old or 4′ 9″ tall.

Ohio’s Child Restraint Law
Children who are in either or both categories:
   • less than 4 years of age:
   • less than 40 pounds:
Primary Enforcement – Child Restraint Violation
Children must be in a properly used child restraint in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions.
4511.81 (A)
(A) (1) – If a child is younger than 4
(A) (2) – If a child weighs less than 40 pounds
4511.81 (B) – If a child is in a day care or pre-school vehicle
(B) (1) – If a child is younger than 4
(B) (2) – If a child weighs less than 40 pounds


Children less than 8 years of age, unless they have reached 4’9″ in height:

Secondary Enforcement – Booster Seat Violation
4511.81 (C) Unless reguired by division (A) or (B) to be secured in child restraints, children must be properly secured in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions in booster seats that meet federal motor vehicle safety standards.
• Regulated daycare vehicles are exempted

Children who are 8-15 years of age (or younger children who are at least 4′ 9″ tall):
Secondary Enforcement – Seat Belt Violation
4511.81 (D) Children must be properly restrained in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions in child restraints, booster seats, or seat belts. • Regardless of front or back seat occupancy.

Note: All of the above sections have the following exemptions: Taxicabs, Public Safety Vehicles, Vehicles not equipped with seat belts at the time of manufacture, Chiropractor or physician affidavit of examption, Life-threatening emergencies.

All of the above sections require the driver to be ticketed, not the child.

All of the above sections are MM on a first offense with a minimum fine of $25 and a maximum fine of $75. Second offenses are M4 that have fines to $250 and jail time to 30 days.

If more than one child is not restrained at the time of the the stop, only one citation can be issued. Include all applicable subsections.

Summary: Ohio Law says children must be in an approved child passenger safety seat until age four and forty pounds. They must then be in a booster until 4′ 9″ tall or 8-years old. Ohio law says All occupants 15 and under must be restrained by a child safety seat, belt positioning booster, or lap and shoulder belts.

Parent & Caregiver Resources

Is Your Child In The Right Seat?

Get Car Seat Safety Tips for Your Child here from SafeKids

Best Car Seat Recommendations

Get Car Seat Safety Tips for Your Child here from SafeKids

Note From A Reader

 “My daughter was severely injured in a car accident a few years back and since then we’ve come up with the idea to start a car safety program at our library. As a mother, her passion and dedication to creating and researching for this program has been something I can be truly proud. This is not something that would have been possible without her. After a few weeks of researching for what my daughter and I considered to be the very best car safety resources on the internet, we found Richland Public Health’s “Child Passenger Safety” page. 

Questions or Comments

We'd love to hear from you. Contact us or take our survey to speak to one of our public health professionals or share your experience with our services. We value your feedback!